Written by James Cooper
Last Updated

Boxing is one of the most intense, high-impact workouts you can do and offers a great mental challenge. It’s for this reason that many people turn to box as a stress reliever. Boxing has been shown to burn calories, boost metabolism and increase endurance. But don’t worry, you don’t need any special equipment to get your boxing fix.

Boxing can be very beneficial to your health, but you should always consult a doctor before starting any new workout program. You must be aware of your physical abilities and limitations before beginning boxing training.

There are many different things you can do to learn how to box, even without special equipment! You only need some creativity and open space to practice all the basics, including punches, blocks, kicks, and footwork. Here are some tips on how you can start teaching yourself boxing at home:

Always Wear a Head Gear

Protect your face! Whether you’re sparring with someone else or just practicing on your own, you should always protect your most crucial asset-your face. You never know when you might accidentally catch a punch with the wrong area of your face, so be sure to start covering up as soon as you begin practicing boxing techniques at home.

Wear Gloves and Protect Your Wrists

Whether you are training alone or with another person, you’ll need to protect your hands and wrists. When learning how to box at home, using gloves is one of the best ways to prevent injuries without the help of a partner or coach. You should always make sure that you get correctly fitted for boxing gloves and wrist wraps before practicing at home (this is important, especially if you plan on competing). If you don’t want to invest in your pair of boxing gloves, you can also use mittens or even oven mitts from your kitchen.

Warm-Up and Cool Down (and Hydrate!)

Before any intense boxing workout at home, you must do some light exercise and stretches. Always remember to stretch all the muscles you will be using for boxing, including your ankles. You should also do some light cardio to get your blood pumping and warm up your heart rate. This will help prevent injuries and keep your body strong! It’s also equally important that you cool down after doing any intense boxing exercises at home. Doing so helps reduce muscle soreness and can prevent personal injury.

Focus on Your Footwork and Coordination

Wrestling is an integral part of boxing. Footwork and coordination are essential for learning how to box, so don’t skip the groundwork even when you’re alone! This will help you improve your speed, reflexes, hand-eye coordination, and overall ability to anticipate your opponent’s next move. You can practice footwork with any shoe that allows you to pivot and push off-just be sure not to lose balance when practicing!

Keep Your Hands Up and Guard Your Face

Always remember to keep your hands up in front of your face when boxing at home by yourself. This will help protect your face from any accidental hits or slips. You should also make sure to keep a safe distance from yourself and a partner when practicing at home, especially during intense sparring sessions.

Try Shadow Boxing and Drill Drills

Shadowboxing is perfect for learning how to box by yourself! It allows you to work on your technique and footwork, as well as helps improve hand-eye coordination. You can also try some different drills that will help you become a more effective boxer. Drills are a great way to practice punches and defense at home!

Watch Boxing Videos and Tutorials

Videos and tutorials are an excellent way to learn new boxing moves. You can find videos on pretty much any boxing technique in existence, so they’re worth checking out! If you’re not sure where to start, here is a great tutorial video on how to do an uppercut (and check out the rest of our YouTube channel for more tutorials!).

Get Creative with Your Training

As long as you focus on improving your coordination and speed, you can practice boxing at home and try out different drills. The possibilities are endless (all those YouTube videos mentioned above should provide some inspiration!), so be sure to have fun!

Find a Partner or Coach on Boxing Forums

If you’re super passionate about boxing, you might consider signing up for a local boxing class or club. If that’s not an option, don’t worry; there are plenty of ways around it! You can find great instructional videos on YouTube (just like the one referenced above), as well as forums where you can connect with other boxers. Forums are also great places to ask questions and find other boxing enthusiasts!

Don’t forget to wear: List of the Best Boxing Pads – 2021 Reviews

Read Books about Boxing and Self Defense

If you’re really into boxing, it might be worth the time to read some books about the sport. There are tons of great articles out there full of information, so don’t be afraid to search for what you want to know! You can also pick up a book or two on self-defense. Learning how to defend yourself can be fun and empowering, and mastering it will help you take your boxing skills up a notch.

Watch Professional Boxing Matches and Compete in Tournaments

If you’re interested in becoming a professional boxer, this is definitely for you! You may want to start with some practice fights in the amateur category, but make sure you do your research before competing! You can also watch professional boxing matches (if you aren’t interested in becoming a boxer, you can still find these on YouTube). Watching experienced fighters will surely help teach you what not to do in your next fight!

Make Good Use of Your Local Gym

Of course, if you have a nearby gym that offers boxing classes or training sessions, this would be the best option for you! Gather some friends who are interested in learning how to box with you. Not only is it lots of fun to learn alongside your friends, but having other people helping out will make the process go by much faster.

Join a Boxing Club or Team

Joining a boxing club is also great for learning how to box at home, but you’ll get the opportunity to train with others and compete in local tournaments! Talk about an adrenaline rush! You might even make some new friends along the way (especially if you join the club at your local gym since you already have this in common).

Conclusion

While boxing is one of the most fun and beneficial workouts out there, it’s also a fantastic way to de-stress. We all know that exercise has several excellent benefits for both the body and mind. Taking up an activity like boxing will help keep you in shape, but it’ll also help you control your anger and frustration. This can be a great feeling to have for those who face exceptionally high levels of stress regularly.

If you’re considering boxing as a potential workout for yourself, make sure to keep these tips in mind! They will ease you into the process and maximize your chances of success.

Now, get out there and start boxing!


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How To Box At Home | Real People Success Stories. (n.d.). Retrieved June 25, 2015, from http://www.realpeoplefitness.com/how-to-box-at-home/

5 Tips on How to Start Boxing At Home. (2014, September 15). Retrieved June 25, 2015, from http://www.elitefitness.com/community/blog_archive/how-to/5-tips-on-how-to-start-boxing-at-home

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Learn How to Box – Boxing Tips & Self Defense Moves to Kick Butt at Home! (2015, February 17). Retrieved June 25, 2015, from http://www.mrniceguyfitness.com/learn-how-to-box

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