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Best Snowboards

Best for Men
Camp Seven 2020 Valdez Snowboard

Best for Women
System 2020 Flite Snowboard

Written by James Cooper
Last Updated
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Buying the best snowboard is fun. But those new to the sport might be overwhelmed by all the information on boards which never seems to be found in one place. This guide aims to show the best snowboards for beginners and also teach those new to the sport how to choose them without any help.

You might be also interested in:

Snowboard Bindings
Snowboard Boots
Snowboarding Gloves
Snowboard Helmets
Snowboard Goggles

  • 1

    Camp Seven 2020 Valdez Snowboard

The versatile snowboard is available in 153cm, 156cm, 158 wide, 159cm, and 163cm wide versions. Made for teenagers, its equipped with snowboard boots and it offers a valuable starter pack for anyone looking to get into the sport. Lightweight, laminated and with summit printings, the board is among the most attractive options for kids and teenagers.

Lightweight laminated dual density DD2 core makes it a special selection. It represents a valuable design for anyone looking to master snowboarding. An extra focus has been placed on edge hold. Even on the iciest conditions, the board proves lighter than particle or press-wood alternatives.

Full-length EVA base pads are added on the binding for a smoother ride. With a custom fit regardless of the riding style, the board is ready to offer impressive responsiveness even as skills improve and snowboarders start to tackle more bumpy terrains.

It also includes APX snowboard boots that are added to the board. Made with a combination of plastic and metal straps, the boots are very easy to use. Designed to accommodate a vast range of boots, they remain lightweight. As the board, the boots are backed by a 3-year warranty for extra peace of mind.

PROS

Available in multiple kids sizes

Includes snowboard boots

Backed by a 3-year warranty

CONS

Only available in one color

  • 2

    System 2020 Flite Snowboard w/Mystic Bindings and Lux Boots

Made with a women’s design, it has extra flexibility and increased comfort for those bumpy rides. The board is now available in 143cm, 146cm and 149cm versions. It suits multiple boot sizes from 5 to 10.

With the board, the manufacturer also includes the new Lux boots with traditional lacing. Made to improve comfort, the boots are also stable on snow and ice for walking purposes. With their all-white design, they also complement the snowboard’s floral pattern.

With an included board and bindings, the package might as well be one of the most popular gift options for girls. At its price, it even includes EVA cushioning which ensures enhanced comfort during the ride for teenage girls.

Characteristics of the best snowboard

When buying a snowboard, you need to think about how it impacts your performance. Its profile and flex are going to be a considerable influence in finding the best board.

Profile

There are a few snowboard profiles you need to know about. They can be found in most snowboard gear shops.

  • Camber

The camber profile is the traditional option. As a result, its seen a lot around the slopes compared to any other boards. Its traditional hourglass shape is what makes it very useful. This type of board remains in contact with the snow at its ends, where it’s the widest. In the middle, the boars are also the narrowest.

It’s also in the middle that the board arches up. It’s to the foot and a high arch. As a result of this high mid arch, the board is only in contact with deep snow at its ends. There are a few benefits to riding with this arch. It makes the board stable but it also means the board has some room to snap back, especially when the uneven terrain demands it.

But these boards aren’t perfect, as any type of board. They’re known to be twitchy and catchy especially during the formation years of the freerider. It might not be the most responsive for those who already have the skills of avoiding and riding obstacles.

But most riders agree the board doesn’t float too well. Deep powder snow is where it shows its limit. For example, soft powdery snow has little support and going downhill on such snow often makes the board nosedive.

But the board might not be the right option for new riders alone. For example, advanced riders might use it on harder terrain. It’s here that its arched shape is going to be particularly helpful with that extra pop which reduced the shocks the rider has to deal with.

  • Rocker

The rocker is normally seen as the opposite of a traditional camber snowboard. It comes with mid-center contact points instead of touching the snow on its edges. Its widest points are raised off the snow. This is the type of board that is easier to turn. Due to its raised ends, it’s going to turn quicker.

Due to its forgiving nature and slow speed maneuverability, the board is now seen with many freestyle riders. Many of those riding for fun seen on the slopes or in relaxed videos are using such forgiving boards.

Made with a catch-free forgiving profile, the board may also be used on flat terrains. Various riders haven even started snowboarding with it. However, it’s not a common board to see being recommended by snowboarding instructions for those starting out.

As with any board, there are pros and cons. The banana shape of the board is very good for maneuverability but very poor on stability. There’s less pop to such a board and they can be less responsive. As a result, a new category of the board is arising which combines cambers and rocker profiles. These hybrids offer the best of both worlds and they’re generally recommended for beginners.

  • Hybrids

Hybrid boards are a bit different from one brand to another. But they combine elements of camber with elements of a rocker. Anyone on a budget who doesn’t want to feel restrictive in terms of pop and maneuverability on various plains can consider such boards.

A rocker section is normally found in the middle of the board, between the feet. The camber sections are in-between the board ends. Variations of this board can be seen with hybrid cambers which put the rocker sections further down the ends of the board.

These boards are stable as they come with a long camber section. But with the rockers situated at the tips or at the ends, it helps pop as they raise the board. These sections which start a turn are now responsible for a lift as well.

Powder

Then there’s the special powder release. This type of board does one thing very well and that is to maintain stability on powdery soft snow. For this to happen, it needs to expend the contact surface considerably.

This is the main reason these boards are made with a long contact surface with a rocker as long as the board itself running all the way up to the edges. This long contact surface is what allows the board to maintain its stability and not sink into the snow.

With the raised edges, the board also fights to sink. One of the main problems other types of boards have on powdery snow is maintaining overall stability without nosediving. The nose rockers are going to be the most beneficial to float.

Flex

The flex pattern refers to the rigidity of the snowboard. It’s different according to materials but it also differs from one brand to another simply based on manufacturer ratings. These ratings vary from 1 to 10 where 1 is the softest mark But these ratings are only true for a manufacturer as all brands consider these ratings differently for their products.

In boarding terms, a softer board is going to be easier to ride as its more forgiving. It absorbs shocks better and it has also been proven to be easier to turn. Anyone into freestyle snowboarding is going to be a bit more comfortable with soft snowboards.

Hardboard is going to be a better choice for tall and heavy riders. At high speeds, its performance is unmatched. Medium-flexing boards combine the best of both worlds and they’re recognized for their versatility.

Shape

When it comes to the best snowboard, the shape cannot be overlooked. Even in the conditions in which there’s not too much emphasis on competitive riding, there should still be some attention given to how certain boards look.

A true-twin shape profile is the same on both ends. They can be ridden regular or switch and they maintain the same approach on both edges. This profile is popular with park riders where the switch riding style is particularly popular.

A directional shape is the opposite of the true-twin as it’s made to go one way only.  Such a board has a rocker nose and flat tail and it’s only made to be ridden in one direction which doesn’t recommend the directional board for freestyle ridings such as boards from FSC or Ollie.

These boards also come with other particularities made to make them ride faster. For example, its narrower in the end which makes it specifically made for the board to sink on the tail. On powder, this type of board is going to show its full strength. Such a board also comes with different binding positioning. For riders to take full advantage of its design, the bindings are installed more towards the tail.

Snowboard size guide

Before purchasing a snowboard, buyers need to understand sizing. Some snowboarders are choosing their boards according to height while others according to weight. A shortboard is lightweight and easier to spin. Buts not as stable at high speeds and it may also be a bit slower. In powder, the longboard alternatives are going to float better and they’re going to be the right choice for high speed.

Here are a few examples of how the weight of the user impacts the size of the board with a quick guide.

With a shortboard length of 144 cm, users are typically between 65 and 115lbs in weight.

A 148m cm board is normally used by those with a weight between 75 and 125lbs.

A board of 151cm is the right choice for users between 95 and 145lbs.

A board of 154cm is the option for those between 115lbs and 165lbs.

At 158cm, the board fits users between 130 and 180lbs.

At 162cm, the board’s length is right for users between 140 and 190lbs.

A long 166cm board is suitable for users of 160 to 205lbs and over.

But these are just general sizing recommendations as users may be leaning towards a custom fit. For example, anyone looking for better stability is going to go with longer boards. New riders who need to make easier turns are going to be a bit more comfortable with shorter boards.

Bindings

Bindings can make or break the potential of the board. They also come in different styles and flex ratings. But the type of riding is going to impact the right choice as well.

Type of riding

Not all bindings are made the same. Some of them are only limited to summit use but there are a few other types of bindings to consider. Made with medium flex ratings, these bindings are versatile for any type of riding and for all types of users’ weights.

Park and freestyle

Park bindings are made for increased mobility. They allow a greater range of motion. As a result, they can also come in soft or medium flex ratings. Rails and jumps are a lot easier to perform with these types of bindings and freestyle boards seen at many manufacturers such as Magne Traction, Burton Custom, Shredders, Slash or Rockered.

Freeride

Made for the most experienced riders, their bindings offer maximum responsiveness. They’re the most responsive bindings. They mainly come with stiff ratings and this is why anyone riding aggressively is going to feel confident about them.

Split board binding

Within the freeride bindings, you can also find split-board bindings. In tour mode, they are hard to match. This is why they only work with split boards.

Flex rating

Just as with boards, bindings also come with flex ratings. 1 is the softest rating. 10 is the stiffest binding flex rating. Again, they should be similar but they differ from one brand to another. This is why it’s important to check each manufacturer’s binding stiffness recommendations.

  • Soft

Soft flex bindings come with the highest forgiveness. Situationally, they allow the rider to get out of rough landings a bit easier. But their highest advantage is given to beginner snowboard riders as they come with added mobility and a better range of motion.

  • Medium

Responsive medium stiffness bindings are ideal for multiple terrain parks today offer. If riders are looking to simply ride the whole mountain, the versatility of medium stiffness bindings is what’s going to make them hard to match.

  • Stiff

All-mountain bindings

These versatile bindings are the right option for those who need maximum playfulness. They’re also useful for a single type of terrain and they are seen across various types of snowboarding. Some of these bindings also come with carbon underfoot elements. This means they’re stiff flex and lighter even if their price is considerably higher.

Most bindings today are going to fit any new board. But in general terms, there are 3 main binding systems to look at, each with their own characteristics.

Binding size varies from small to large. Small bindings might be limited as can be bindings that are too large. The right fit is very specific and there should be nor wobble room regarding the bindings’ design.

Warranty

Most snowboards are covered by some type of warranty. Even the cheapest boards should be covered by the manufacturer. A 1-year policy is considered a short warranty for this gear. A 3-year warranty is considered good policy for most types of boards. But it can take a bit of research to find these boards as most are only covered for 1-2 years.

Most issues with snowboard warranty claim come from improper use. For example, if a board gets damaged or broken by heavy users not abiding by the manufacturer’s weight recommendations, the warranty is going to be voided and a replacement board is not going to be issued.

Those who might run out on tarmac from the snow might not be able to claim a replacement board either as they’re only made to run on snow. This becomes an issue with high-quality snowboards that are expensive to replace.

Making the most of the best snowboard

Even the best snowboard is not going to go far if it’s not handled properly. For a number of users, it remains clear that mastering the basics is needed to test out any type of snowboard. Here’s how these boards can be tested and differentiated with basic movements and snowboarding tips.

  • Stance

The stance is the most important when starting out in the sport and testing out different board styles. Ankles, knees, and hips are in line when standing on a snowboard. The standing position should be relaxed and surfers should be in line with the board.

Testing a snowboard should occur on flat ground, where it’s not going to slide away. Skating on the snowboard is going to be a good technique to test out the board as well as to learn how to master snowboarding altogether before performing movements such as sidecuts. One foot is not going to be secured on the board for this to happen.

The backfoot can be placed behind the snowboard and used to make small steps to one side in order to start mastering sliding movements. A camber is going to be found for this movement. The next step is to put more weight on the front foot by changing the center of gravity. This teaches the snowboarder how to maintain balance. Coasting is going to be next, the back foot is going to be placed on the board and cost at low speed.

A new rider can also use the correct setback stance position to establish the fit of the board and of the bindings. The rider doesn’t need to go downhill to test out if the bindings are tight or loose. In fact, it can be dangerous to try them out this way. The best solution is to simply try them out on the spot without gliding or moving around.

  • Gliding

A short simple slope is going to be right for gliding exercises. With the same stance and the backfoot unsecured in the binding, users can start gliding down the slope. There should be a natural flat ground at the end of the slope to stop the board. Those who don’t feel too comfortable with the glide can start further down the slope.

Turns can be practiced with any board. To turn inwards or to the left, the snowboarder needs to lean a bit back until the calves hit the back of the bindings. The opposing toe side of the board is going to lift a little bit during this maneuver.

Toeside turn movements are going to start with ankle flexing with the weight moved towards the toes. This subtle movement should also be short and it can be practiced both in a standing position on the spot or with a gliding movement.

  • Traversing

Traversing is easy on cambers. On a slope, snowboarders are going to shift their weight towards the front foot with bouncing movements until they start moving across the hill. This diagonal movement is called traversing.

But traversing can be done both with the face facing the mountain and with the back facing the mountain. The movement is the same but it’s the center of gravity which changes on these. When facing the mountain, the rider needs to shift the body a bit forwards towards the toes. When the back is facing the mountain, this weight is then changed towards the heels.

The same principles are applied to connecting turns which are easier to perform now that these basic movements have been performed. Connecting turns are easy to perform and they require the rider to switch sides as needed on the descent.

Mistakes made in choosing a snowboard

Choosing the best all-mountain snowboards is often subject to mistakes. The most common mistake is going for the fastest board without having the skills for fast riding. But there are a few other mistakes new snowboarders make.

  • Choosing a rockirider first

A rockrider is a fantastic board but those just starting out are not going to need it at first. An all-mountain board should be all that’s needed to get started in the sport. The all-mountain board comes with the elevated mid for that pop and forgiveness. Whenever there’s a mistake being made, the board is going to be a bit more forgiving.

In the beginning, mistakes are frequent. Even stopping at traverse glide as described above is going to be difficult for a beginner on a very fast board. Of course, proper technique is going to teach beginners how to do this. But until they learn how to shift the weight back and center it in the middle of the board to stop, snowboarders are going to need patience just to get accustomed to basic riding skills.

Other possible issues arise with expensive gear such as carbon fiber bindings. While their performance is incredible, they shouldn’t be needed at the beginning while skills are improving. Even aluminum bindings should be enough for anyone looking to get into the sport, at least for a few years. The average rider is not going to be able to tell the difference between premium carbon bindings and standard bindings anyways. Burton, Lib Tech, NeverSummer, Capita, Groomers, Orca, Salomon, or Surfy are just a few brands making such bindings.

  • Buying overly-tight bindings

Buying the right size bindings is important as well. Not many users can establish the right fit without a bit of research. With the wrong size, they’re going to seriously limit the efficiency of the best board. As a result, bindings should be considered by anyone looking to get into the sport as equally important to the board.

As mentioned before, there are different types of bindings mainly categorized by size. The 2 snowboards above already come with their own bindings. But how does a snowboarder choose the size of the right binding when placing an Amazon order?

The sizing guide needs to be found in the product description category of the snowboard. The examples above come with sizing between 6 and 10 but they are a few other options in extreme sizes as well. However, all sizing guides might be different from brand to brand according to the design of the binding and check the manufacturer’s recommendations is recommended.

  • Not adhering to user weight limit recommendations

As seen above, the weight limits of a snowboard are very important. Unlike a few brands, most manufacturers are recommending their products according to rider weight, not height. This is why there should be some type of disclaimer on all products when purchasing online for those who’re new to the sport.

However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that riders don’t go with heavier boards even if they have low weight as they might be looking to gain speed or perform better on powder. But for the average user who’s going to master snowboarding, abiding by these weight recommendations is crucial.

Different wood cores plastics and even foam top sheets are used in the makings of a snowboard. As a result, the impact of the user’s weight on these materials is going to be seen differently. The more the user doesn’t respect these recommendations, the more the board is going to suffer or even break. Foam might be the first layer of the board which is going to suffer under the heavyweight as it might not maintain the same level of cushioning is has been designed for.

  • Testing out a board on powder

Testing a board should be made on a small slope, especially as a beginner. On powder, there’s not a lot of room for maneuverability and riders might not interpret the board’s characteristics correctly as a result as with a powder board.

PROS

CONS

Characteristics of the best snowboard

When buying a snowboard, you need to think about how it impacts your performance. Its profile and flex are going to be a considerable influence in finding the best board.

Profile

There are a few snowboard profiles you need to know about. They can be found in most snowboard gear shops.

  • Camber

The camber profile is the traditional option. As a result, its seen a lot around the slopes compared to any other boards. Its traditional hourglass shape is what makes it very useful. This type of board remains in contact with the snow at its ends, where it’s the widest. In the middle, the boars are also the narrowest.

It’s also in the middle that the board arches up. It’s to the foot and a high arch. As a result of this high mid arch, the board is only in contact with deep snow at its ends. There are a few benefits to riding with this arch. It makes the board stable but it also means the board has some room to snap back, especially when the uneven terrain demands it.

But these boards aren’t perfect, as any type of board. They’re known to be twitchy and catchy especially during the formation years of the freerider. It might not be the most responsive for those who already have the skills of avoiding and riding obstacles.

But most riders agree the board doesn’t float too well. Deep powder snow is where it shows its limit. For example, soft powdery snow has little support and going downhill on such snow often makes the board nosedive.

But the board might not be the right option for new riders alone. For example, advanced riders might use it on harder terrain. It’s here that its arched shape is going to be particularly helpful with that extra pop which reduced the shocks the rider has to deal with.

  • Rocker

The rocker is normally seen as the opposite of a traditional camber snowboard. It comes with mid-center contact points instead of touching the snow on its edges. Its widest points are raised off the snow. This is the type of board that is easier to turn. Due to its raised ends, it’s going to turn quicker.

Due to its forgiving nature and slow speed maneuverability, the board is now seen with many freestyle riders. Many of those riding for fun seen on the slopes or in relaxed videos are using such forgiving boards.

Made with a catch-free forgiving profile, the board may also be used on flat terrains. Various riders haven even started snowboarding with it. However, it’s not a common board to see being recommended by snowboarding instructions for those starting out.

As with any board, there are pros and cons. The banana shape of the board is very good for maneuverability but very poor on stability. There’s less pop to such a board and they can be less responsive. As a result, a new category of the board is arising which combines cambers and rocker profiles. These hybrids offer the best of both worlds and they’re generally recommended for beginners.

  • Hybrids

Hybrid boards are a bit different from one brand to another. But they combine elements of camber with elements of a rocker. Anyone on a budget who doesn’t want to feel restrictive in terms of pop and maneuverability on various plains can consider such boards.

A rocker section is normally found in the middle of the board, between the feet. The camber sections are in-between the board ends. Variations of this board can be seen with hybrid cambers which put the rocker sections further down the ends of the board.

These boards are stable as they come with a long camber section. But with the rockers situated at the tips or at the ends, it helps pop as they raise the board. These sections which start a turn are now responsible for a lift as well.

Powder

Then there’s the special powder release. This type of board does one thing very well and that is to maintain stability on powdery soft snow. For this to happen, it needs to expend the contact surface considerably.

This is the main reason these boards are made with a long contact surface with a rocker as long as the board itself running all the way up to the edges. This long contact surface is what allows the board to maintain its stability and not sink into the snow.

With the raised edges, the board also fights to sink. One of the main problems other types of boards have on powdery snow is maintaining overall stability without nosediving. The nose rockers are going to be the most beneficial to float.

Flex

The flex pattern refers to the rigidity of the snowboard. It’s different according to materials but it also differs from one brand to another simply based on manufacturer ratings. These ratings vary from 1 to 10 where 1 is the softest mark But these ratings are only true for a manufacturer as all brands consider these ratings differently for their products.

In boarding terms, a softer board is going to be easier to ride as its more forgiving. It absorbs shocks better and it has also been proven to be easier to turn. Anyone into freestyle snowboarding is going to be a bit more comfortable with soft snowboards.

Hardboard is going to be a better choice for tall and heavy riders. At high speeds, its performance is unmatched. Medium-flexing boards combine the best of both worlds and they’re recognized for their versatility.

Shape

When it comes to the best snowboard, the shape cannot be overlooked. Even in the conditions in which there’s not too much emphasis on competitive riding, there should still be some attention given to how certain boards look.

A true-twin shape profile is the same on both ends. They can be ridden regular or switch and they maintain the same approach on both edges. This profile is popular with park riders where the switch riding style is particularly popular.

A directional shape is the opposite of the true-twin as it’s made to go one way only.  Such a board has a rocker nose and flat tail and it’s only made to be ridden in one direction which doesn’t recommend the directional board for freestyle ridings such as boards from FSC or Ollie.

These boards also come with other particularities made to make them ride faster. For example, its narrower in the end which makes it specifically made for the board to sink on the tail. On powder, this type of board is going to show its full strength. Such a board also comes with different binding positioning. For riders to take full advantage of its design, the bindings are installed more towards the tail.

Snowboard size guide

Before purchasing a snowboard, buyers need to understand sizing. Some snowboarders are choosing their boards according to height while others according to weight. A shortboard is lightweight and easier to spin. Buts not as stable at high speeds and it may also be a bit slower. In powder, the longboard alternatives are going to float better and they’re going to be the right choice for high speed.

Here are a few examples of how the weight of the user impacts the size of the board with a quick guide.

With a shortboard length of 144 cm, users are typically between 65 and 115lbs in weight.

A 148m cm board is normally used by those with a weight between 75 and 125lbs.

A board of 151cm is the right choice for users between 95 and 145lbs.

A board of 154cm is the option for those between 115lbs and 165lbs.

At 158cm, the board fits users between 130 and 180lbs.

At 162cm, the board’s length is right for users between 140 and 190lbs.

A long 166cm board is suitable for users of 160 to 205lbs and over.

But these are just general sizing recommendations as users may be leaning towards a custom fit. For example, anyone looking for better stability is going to go with longer boards. New riders who need to make easier turns are going to be a bit more comfortable with shorter boards.

Bindings

Bindings can make or break the potential of the board. They also come in different styles and flex ratings. But the type of riding is going to impact the right choice as well.

Type of riding

Not all bindings are made the same. Some of them are only limited to summit use but there are a few other types of bindings to consider. Made with medium flex ratings, these bindings are versatile for any type of riding and for all types of users’ weights.

Park and freestyle

Park bindings are made for increased mobility. They allow a greater range of motion. As a result, they can also come in soft or medium flex ratings. Rails and jumps are a lot easier to perform with these types of bindings and freestyle boards seen at many manufacturers such as Magne Traction, Burton Custom, Shredders, Slash or Rockered.

Freeride

Made for the most experienced riders, their bindings offer maximum responsiveness. They’re the most responsive bindings. They mainly come with stiff ratings and this is why anyone riding aggressively is going to feel confident about them.

Split board binding

Within the freeride bindings, you can also find split-board bindings. In tour mode, they are hard to match. This is why they only work with split boards.

Flex rating

Just as with boards, bindings also come with flex ratings. 1 is the softest rating. 10 is the stiffest binding flex rating. Again, they should be similar but they differ from one brand to another. This is why it’s important to check each manufacturer’s binding stiffness recommendations.

  • Soft

Soft flex bindings come with the highest forgiveness. Situationally, they allow the rider to get out of rough landings a bit easier. But their highest advantage is given to beginner snowboard riders as they come with added mobility and a better range of motion.

  • Medium

Responsive medium stiffness bindings are ideal for multiple terrain parks today offer. If riders are looking to simply ride the whole mountain, the versatility of medium stiffness bindings is what’s going to make them hard to match.

  • Stiff

All-mountain bindings

These versatile bindings are the right option for those who need maximum playfulness. They’re also useful for a single type of terrain and they are seen across various types of snowboarding. Some of these bindings also come with carbon underfoot elements. This means they’re stiff flex and lighter even if their price is considerably higher.

Most bindings today are going to fit any new board. But in general terms, there are 3 main binding systems to look at, each with their own characteristics.

Binding size varies from small to large. Small bindings might be limited as can be bindings that are too large. The right fit is very specific and there should be nor wobble room regarding the bindings’ design.

Warranty

Most snowboards are covered by some type of warranty. Even the cheapest boards should be covered by the manufacturer. A 1-year policy is considered a short warranty for this gear. A 3-year warranty is considered good policy for most types of boards. But it can take a bit of research to find these boards as most are only covered for 1-2 years.

Most issues with snowboard warranty claim come from improper use. For example, if a board gets damaged or broken by heavy users not abiding by the manufacturer’s weight recommendations, the warranty is going to be voided and a replacement board is not going to be issued.

Those who might run out on tarmac from the snow might not be able to claim a replacement board either as they’re only made to run on snow. This becomes an issue with high-quality snowboards that are expensive to replace.

Making the most of the best snowboard

Even the best snowboard is not going to go far if it’s not handled properly. For a number of users, it remains clear that mastering the basics is needed to test out any type of snowboard. Here’s how these boards can be tested and differentiated with basic movements and snowboarding tips.

  • Stance

The stance is the most important when starting out in the sport and testing out different board styles. Ankles, knees, and hips are in line when standing on a snowboard. The standing position should be relaxed and surfers should be in line with the board.

Testing a snowboard should occur on flat ground, where it’s not going to slide away. Skating on the snowboard is going to be a good technique to test out the board as well as to learn how to master snowboarding altogether before performing movements such as sidecuts. One foot is not going to be secured on the board for this to happen.

The backfoot can be placed behind the snowboard and used to make small steps to one side in order to start mastering sliding movements. A camber is going to be found for this movement. The next step is to put more weight on the front foot by changing the center of gravity. This teaches the snowboarder how to maintain balance. Coasting is going to be next, the back foot is going to be placed on the board and cost at low speed.

A new rider can also use the correct setback stance position to establish the fit of the board and of the bindings. The rider doesn’t need to go downhill to test out if the bindings are tight or loose. In fact, it can be dangerous to try them out this way. The best solution is to simply try them out on the spot without gliding or moving around.

  • Gliding

A short simple slope is going to be right for gliding exercises. With the same stance and the backfoot unsecured in the binding, users can start gliding down the slope. There should be a natural flat ground at the end of the slope to stop the board. Those who don’t feel too comfortable with the glide can start further down the slope.

Turns can be practiced with any board. To turn inwards or to the left, the snowboarder needs to lean a bit back until the calves hit the back of the bindings. The opposing toe side of the board is going to lift a little bit during this maneuver.

Toeside turn movements are going to start with ankle flexing with the weight moved towards the toes. This subtle movement should also be short and it can be practiced both in a standing position on the spot or with a gliding movement.

  • Traversing

Traversing is easy on cambers. On a slope, snowboarders are going to shift their weight towards the front foot with bouncing movements until they start moving across the hill. This diagonal movement is called traversing.

But traversing can be done both with the face facing the mountain and with the back facing the mountain. The movement is the same but it’s the center of gravity which changes on these. When facing the mountain, the rider needs to shift the body a bit forwards towards the toes. When the back is facing the mountain, this weight is then changed towards the heels.

The same principles are applied to connecting turns which are easier to perform now that these basic movements have been performed. Connecting turns are easy to perform and they require the rider to switch sides as needed on the descent.

Mistakes made in choosing a snowboard

Choosing the best all-mountain snowboards is often subject to mistakes. The most common mistake is going for the fastest board without having the skills for fast riding. But there are a few other mistakes new snowboarders make.

  • Choosing a rockirider first

A rockrider is a fantastic board but those just starting out are not going to need it at first. An all-mountain board should be all that’s needed to get started in the sport. The all-mountain board comes with the elevated mid for that pop and forgiveness. Whenever there’s a mistake being made, the board is going to be a bit more forgiving.

In the beginning, mistakes are frequent. Even stopping at traverse glide as described above is going to be difficult for a beginner on a very fast board. Of course, proper technique is going to teach beginners how to do this. But until they learn how to shift the weight back and center it in the middle of the board to stop, snowboarders are going to need patience just to get accustomed to basic riding skills.

Other possible issues arise with expensive gear such as carbon fiber bindings. While their performance is incredible, they shouldn’t be needed at the beginning while skills are improving. Even aluminum bindings should be enough for anyone looking to get into the sport, at least for a few years. The average rider is not going to be able to tell the difference between premium carbon bindings and standard bindings anyways. Burton, Lib Tech, NeverSummer, Capita, Groomers, Orca, Salomon, or Surfy are just a few brands making such bindings.

  • Buying overly-tight bindings

Buying the right size bindings is important as well. Not many users can establish the right fit without a bit of research. With the wrong size, they’re going to seriously limit the efficiency of the best board. As a result, bindings should be considered by anyone looking to get into the sport as equally important to the board.

As mentioned before, there are different types of bindings mainly categorized by size. The 2 snowboards above already come with their own bindings. But how does a snowboarder choose the size of the right binding when placing an Amazon order?

The sizing guide needs to be found in the product description category of the snowboard. The examples above come with sizing between 6 and 10 but they are a few other options in extreme sizes as well. However, all sizing guides might be different from brand to brand according to the design of the binding and check the manufacturer’s recommendations is recommended.

  • Not adhering to user weight limit recommendations

As seen above, the weight limits of a snowboard are very important. Unlike a few brands, most manufacturers are recommending their products according to rider weight, not height. This is why there should be some type of disclaimer on all products when purchasing online for those who’re new to the sport.

However, it doesn’t necessarily mean that riders don’t go with heavier boards even if they have low weight as they might be looking to gain speed or perform better on powder. But for the average user who’s going to master snowboarding, abiding by these weight recommendations is crucial.

Different wood cores plastics and even foam top sheets are used in the makings of a snowboard. As a result, the impact of the user’s weight on these materials is going to be seen differently. The more the user doesn’t respect these recommendations, the more the board is going to suffer or even break. Foam might be the first layer of the board which is going to suffer under the heavyweight as it might not maintain the same level of cushioning is has been designed for.

  • Testing out a board on powder

Testing a board should be made on a small slope, especially as a beginner. On powder, there’s not a lot of room for maneuverability and riders might not interpret the board’s characteristics correctly as a result as with a powder board.

FAQ


How many types of snowboards are made?

There are 3 main types of snowboards in mass production today. All-mountain or freeride snowboards are the most popular among them. Mountain freestyle rockers boards are also made for riders who already master the sport and who need a bit more freedom on their rides. Hybrids are a combination of the 2 boards and they come in different designs which can be vastly different from one manufacturer to another.

Anyone considering getting into snowboarding should first think about good all-mountain design. It’s here that they’ll find the easiest board to ride for most of their needs. But even experienced riders are seen with these on the summit every snowboarding season.

How do I choose a snowboard?

Those riding in a park are going to benefit from a shorter snowboard. Powder and freeriding fans are going to benefit from a longer board. The recommendations on each board also include weight limits. Anyone looking to get into snowboarding should consider there 2 characteristics first.

But the right snowboard should also look good. There are many unique colors, prints and even snowboards with different natural wood stains to consider. It has been proven many times that new sports are a matter of habits juts to be adhered by. Those who want to start and keep snowboarding are going to need to get beautiful gear which will excite them to go out in the park and practice more.

What's the best beginner snowboard?

The camber is the best beginner snowboard. It simplifies the snowboarding process and it can be one of the most reliable options for anyone looking to get their hands on a versatile board. It supports constant abuse and mild accidents such as falls. But this board is also versatile as it doesn’t need to be replaced once snowboarding skills start improving, which can’t be said about many other types of boards.